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How to Understand how to Improve Outcomes in Your School

processpeople

Edward Deming

From pre-school to higher education we have been both officially and unofficially held to expected outcomes by our communities who uphold the value of education. Throughout the ages of school improvement it has always been an inherent mission for schools is to educate students to be better than they were. When asking this question of being better than they were or can we truthfully measure our outcomes to measure our school attenders and employees that they are succeeding to achieve at their true potential. When we walk the halls and view classrooms or sit in on an online course what is the measure that the teacher is reaching their full potential or are the students being an realizing an opportunity to move closer to their potential? Schools have often accepted redundant teaching methods over the years and produced lesson plans that have been the same way for many years. When our student audience has changed over the years our teaching approaches now needed to adapt to the learning styles and values of our society.

It is a proven fact that giving grades for our students is without a doubt is a very subjective measure to predict and show competencies accomplished. Very little is measured from a skills perspective for skill in a competency at the conclusion of any term. We can extend this weakness to how we give opportunities for the educators to improve their potential by improving instruction. The measures of instruction fit into the same class as our student measures which is very subjective. As we look at these glaring facts our schools at all levels of for-profit, non-profit, private and sectarian are influenced by government regulations focusing on these old outdated forms of measurement. Our states are using standardized testing for measuring the success of their resident students. When we should be looking for improvement, we are looking at a standards established for only those that could meet the artificial targets. Improvement starts with a baseline and a build from there.

I am sure many of you remember the movie “Money Ball” with Brad Pitt as the general manager of a professional baseball team. This was a story of an actual team who relied on results to improve the team outcomes with success. The data were pointed at the key targets to make baseline improvement of the team. Measurement dictates a process for improving outcomes. The baseball team proceeded to an ultimate outcome of success. If we can use the premise of process by using data we too can have success in our schools.

Schools and colleges making these adjustments will offer to all their stakeholders visible growth by allowing for participants to move to higher potentials. By making these process changes outcomes are not subjective but measuring validated targets after the improvement of learning.

If you have any interest in making this change I have the process used now for eight years that makes the data work for you. Process is key to success in any organization. Process was the key to improving industry by a famous industrial consultant who rebuilt Japan after World War II. Dr. Edward Deming.

Process Steps

Surprisingly Schools have not did much to capitalize on this process. Research coming forth now may change this practice in our academic centers.

deminggraph

Edward Deming

Change for the future

It is certain that by establishing the correct target by using data and analytics with schools in any environment or culture can improve. GRCARLSON INC. are here to help you make the transition.

Plan

Process in action with coaching for faculty, teacher and instructor improvement.

 

Save

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ARTSY School

I have become intrigued by a school in Detroit, Michigan. The “Motion Picture Institute,” is probably the best-hidden secret in the midwest. They have been producing talent for the film industry for years and are now emerging to even higher levels of achievement in the film industry. Recently their CEO Douglas Schulze published an article in their blog. It allows us to see how far we have come and where we need to go.

Enjoy! http://bit.ly/artsyschool

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4-year​ colleges are they part of the past?

Attention gets retention! What are the key factors that have driven the college scene to a completely different portrait from the past? I have included a link to one states take on the situation. This may be more common to other states than just like North Carolina. What are the effective steps colleges are implementing and considering to improve their completion outcomes with high success?

North Carolina challenged:http://bit.ly/31myUqQ

AIoT

Our schools should be keeping a close eye on this industry. Due to the growth and demand in our work, home and recreation activity smart technology is moving very fast to the internet. Your school could be a pioneer in education for these new jobs that will be appearing. Please see the link for information on the industry. Don’t be left in the dark on this societal demand for service.

What is AIoT?

Driving innovation and gaining a competitive advantage require more than just connecting devices and gathering data. Without AI capabilities, IoT devices and the data they produce would have limited value. And AI applications would struggle for relevancy if it weren’t for the IoT data flooding today’s utilities, manufacturers, retailers, hospitals, insurers, etc. The IoT gives brands the potential to expand the customer experience, anticipating needs and becoming truly embedded in the consumer’s world. When you merge AI and IoT, you get the Artificial Intelligence of Things, or AIoT – a revolutionary combination that can transform industries, elevate customer experiences and accelerate business performance exponentially.

Look at the possibilities: http://bit.ly/iothngs

Common Good vs. Special Interest (Statesmen vs. Politicians)

Recently, I became part of a partnership with some leaders who have given their entire working lives to the education of the American population. These people span across all factions of what makes schools succeed with their mission and purpose. We have seen in the history of education outgrowth of offerings with positive outgrowth based upon demand and desires of our American society. Schools opportunity can only be sustained by a society that embraces the mission of each type of school. The secret to great schools is often overlooked by bureaucratic impositions on the common good a school may bring to a community, family or economy. Our school opportunities across our country for our citizens has been eclectic to satisfy the freedom of education doctrine in the United States. It is commendable that our forefathers saw the need to allow people to observe and embrace all types of freedoms. Historically schools have evolved over time by the needs of purpose and mission. We can follow the institution of school and how they became education providers by the demand for specific needs of a free societal consumer. Dictating whether a school should be public, private, secular, career, vocational, college, nonprofit or proprietary is diametrically in opposition to freedoms afforded the citizens of this country.   In America, we are granted certain inalienable rights and they are not to be infringed upon by any government entity. 

History will reveal what the consequences are when a government holds the power of bias and diminishes the opportunity of choice by citizens. School opportunity exists for the people and by the people. Freedom constitutes a stronger foundation when or knowledge base is broadened and not narrowed.

School survival should be dependent on our societal needs and desires. This accounts for professional, career, fine arts and skilled education. Making any one entity more important or regulated inequitably creates gaps in freedom and knowledge.

To hold on tightly to what is good and right we must not forget the senses we operate daily with in our lives. We have our given granted senses of touch, hearing, vision, and smell. Each of these senses carries certain responsibilities for us to make decisions. Freedom of speech is a human right. By not allowing freedom of speech it leads to tyranny. This subscription to rights is highlighted as the bricks and mortar of our freedom statement to each other. What is not as emphasized as much is the responsibility to be an informed listener. Throughout our time information communicated both verbally and in writing has found its way into our life with many different vehicles of distribution. Today, we have more information coming to us than ever before in the history of our existence. By 2026, it is expected worldwide there will be 26 billion connections to the internet. The obligation to us has not been to curtail the freedom of speech but to, more importantly, know what is true or false. We have all had the experience when someone may communicate a mistruth so much they and their followers believe it is the truth. To be an informed citizen requires us to question critically all statements and messages by doing the inspection of the facts. The danger of tyranny, prejudice, scapegoating and abuse can be fueled by not being a better-informed listener. Our institutions can be undermined by views that are to quickly accepted as truth. The strength that embraces all our diversity in America is maintaining the ability to embrace the common good for all citizens.

How Can We Measure our Bias?

What are your biases in life? How did we acquire these biases. Can they be changed? Do our leaders have biases? Over the past decade with the ability to use the communication opportunities of social media, news media, webcast, entertainment and politicians we have enabled the opportunity to embellish our own biases in hopes to get others onto our wagon. We have all grown up with shaping of our minds with beliefs, faith, hope, joy, and most of all our self preserved principles. All of these characteristics shapes our conduct and personality. Where does this come from; by either learned bias from formal education or by experiences in life’s journey or through our own research of the valued principles we hold dearly to ourselves. A good place to start is with myself I believe.

My life started in a humble family of no professionals but mainly skilled laborers and service employees. Upon my birth into this world there was great joy and hope in the America for World War II had just ended. My uncles had all served in the armed services and maintained a high level of patriotism. First principle I learned was to stand for the U.S. flag and to say the pledge of allegiance. My knowledge of World War II was completely from my family up through age five. This principle wasn’t a burden for me and it presented a great deal of pride for me to live in such a great successful country. My father chose to join the Army National Guard and remained at this duty for the rest of his life. Serving was not an obligation but was a privilege. My small community in Iowa resonated with this same principle of patriotism.

School for me was part of what everyone needed to do when they were my age. I never really looked at where it was going to take me in life. No one in my family had gone beyond high school and some hadn’t finished high school. My future didn’t include anything after high school graduation. My high school peers were preparing to leave after high school and go on to college. I held a great sense of pride for them to be going on to college. My high school counselor had advised me that I should look at getting work in a gas station after graduation. It I can’t tell you how much that seemed reasonable to me. This is where probably my first greatest bias came to bear on me. I just knew I didn’t have what it takes to go to college or graduate.

My future presented be something different. My family and peer group in my life provided me with the notion for further education to give it a try. When I left my small community and went to college a whole new world evolved with biases that have transcended from all the other experiences in life. When looking back I knew right from wrong and so many biases came from families that had transposed good too bad and love to hate and self gain. My observation sometimes saw greatness and positive leadership in others but it was a first time I had seen negative in any numbers of people. Now I was hearing biases of race, religion, politics and economy. College now was becoming a melting pot of ideas and I now had the opportunity to make choices. As I made these choices where was I determining the rode I must follow? Was it fact versus hear say? Was it opinion versus research? Was it faith and trust versus knowledge? By making the decisions did I become stronger by living up to these beliefs with my peers and ongoing trends? The sources of change then was not social media but we now had television, news reporters, nation wide coverage, sports figures, entertainers and leaders in our country who could direct a mission towards certain beliefs and consequences.

Today’s world is much more sophisticated. Influence and intention of social media, news media, and technology has the ability to influence people by just the number of repetitive remarks of one kind of communication to change minds, ideas, positions, faith and trust. A principle of past was the responsibility to act upon the truth. Through sensationalism we can excite people into a frenzy with truth or no truth.

So where does all of this take us in a country we have been so proud to live? How has our leadership not been affected by these pitfalls of bias? Or has it been embraced to abuse and lead with their own biases instead of the truth. A bias often is from the experiences of a person’s life in education, family, religion, political parties, race and wealth. When many of these biases are examined we find examples of mistruths and damaging outcomes to our communities in general.

Biases among ourselves and this country are many. Today we must be capable of determining what bias our population is positive or negative by the truth. It is imperative to require ourselves to not carry on sensational ideas and yellow journalism by reinforcing false facts. It shouldn’t happen that if I have enough money to put into social media or print something that is without fact or truth repeatedly I will get society to believe it. Don’t let decisions to follow come from greed, power or being a celebrity.

Positive bias can be very enriching and productive. Let’s be bias for right versus wrong. Our forefathers spelled it out very well with categories of necessary pillars of truth. Our future lies in the ability to look back and forward at the same time to learn from our mistakes and build upon a new world. This cannot become the society that had so much information they didn’t know how to sort it out or analyze for the truth.

I ask you as a citizen to:

  • Reject Passivity to represent the truth
  • Accept responsibility for the directions we could be experiencing
  • Lead courageously in your family and community

IoT What is IT?

Recently I read an SAS article which gives us a perspective to what is to come for the education of students in an area that was and is booming. Right now demand is growing for experts to develop and maintain this industry. Please read the SAS white paper document that gives us an introduction to the inviting profession of IoT.

A Non-Geeks A-to-Z Guide to the Internet of Things


INTRODUCTION
Defining the Internet of Things isn’t easy. When it’s defined in terms of market size, some focus on the potential revenue (it’s in the trillions), while others focus on the number of potential “Things” (it’s in the billions). Some definitions focus on the exponential growth of sensors, excluding smartphones, tablets and desktop computers, while others only consider devices with an IP address. Whether these definitions and forecasts are accurate or not, it can be downright confusing. How would you define the Internet of Things (or IoT, as it is commonly called)? If you were to ask 20 people, you would most likely end up with 21 different definitions, including yours. And guess what? That’s OK. It’s not important that we all agree on a single definition. What’s important is that we understand the context or frame of reference in which the Internet of Things is being discussed. A good case in point is big data. When the term started to become popular in 2011, almost every article, research report, interview and panel discussion for the next few years began with a definition of big data. Was it necessary to define each time? Yes, it was – and it still is – because it is the responsibility of an author/speaker to provide the proper context for the reader/listener – especially when it involves emerging terms like big data and the Internet of Things. Different Ways to View the IoT While you won’t find a canonical definition of IoT in this guide, it’s still interesting to note how different organizations describe it. Here are a few: The IoT links objects to the Internet, enabling data and insights never available before. (Cisco) The network of physical objects that contain embedded technology to communicate and sense or interact with their internal states or the external environment. (Gartner) Whether these definitions and forecasts are accurate or not, it can be downright confusing. 2

A Non-Geek’s A-to-Z Guide to the Internet of Things

Internet of Things

• A global infrastructure for the information society, enabling advanced services by interconnecting (physical and virtual) things based on existing and evolving interoperable information and communication technologies. (IoT-GSI)

• IoT describes a world where just about anything can be connected and communicate in an intelligent fashion. In other words, with the Internet of Things, the physical world is becoming one big information system. (Techopedia)

• It’s a concept of everyday objects – from industrial machines to wearable devices – using built-in sensors to gather data and take action on that data across a network. (SAS Institute)

These illustrative descriptions highlight IoT’s common traits – connectivity, “things” and data/information – while giving us a good sense of the tremendous impact it will have on life as we know it. For a more thorough discussion on the Internet of Things – including its history, importance, who uses it and how it works – read Internet of Things (IoT): What it is and why it matters on sas.com.

Who has IoT in their program curriculum?

The Tale of Proprietary Schools

From the past.


Modern today classroom

How many times have you heard the story of an inventor, entrepreneur, outstanding athlete or a success story when the majority of the people around them did not support their efforts or ideas. Surprisingly these individuals met with great success. What set them apart to not give up on their dream? A dream without a plan is only a wish! History has shown us the dream of these successful people produced their plan to succeed. Proprietary schools started in the same fashion when colleges and universities were not educating people in the skilled areas the businesses were seeking. This gap gave us our first accountants, executive secretaries, medical secretaries, paralegals, and service oriented career possibilities. New innovations that came upon us in the workforce throughout the years again created more opportunity but there was no one filling the skill gaps. Again, proprietary schools stepped up to implement information technology education.

When irritating people or circumstances come our way, we can react in one of four ways. First, we can look heavenward and shout, “Why me?” I always wondered about that question. Is there someone else you would rather wish this on? Secondly, we can deny the irritation is there. Many live along the banks of the river Denial. Thirdly, we can wax macho and declare, “I ain’t gonna let this bother me! I can take it.” Finally, we can learn a lesson from the oyster and produce attitudes and actions that can turn an irritation into a pearl. 

By: Steve Sabol

When I first began my journey into proprietary school services I found a marvelous group of people primarily dedicated to filling the skill gaps of America. There was a constant awareness of what their communities needed for entry level job seekers. When opportunities would arise proprietary school leadership answered the call faster by working directly with employers through employer advisory groups. New programs were developed to be targeted to supply and demand of the communities they served. Our question today is “Did we lose sight of this process worked for proprietary schools and community”?

America is still abundant with opportunity. So many jobs are going to be needed in the workforce where we don’t yet have categories for some of these jobs. Our consumers are buying products that have very little trained support to maintain. Technology commands the desperate need for people to fill jobs that will and do exist because of internet and wifi created inventions our consumer uses everyday. Our lives are affected by construction of smart homes, smart office buildings, webcast, social media use, Alexa, Google Home, Facebook, security, medical devices and the list can go on and on. Our attitude is to not be different than it ever was in the past. Our search is to be there with the best quality training in the abundance of opportunity all around us.

During the past year my days have been somewhat devoted to a recovery of this apparent gap of skilled workers through the service of our proprietary schools. While looking at the necessary paradigm changes all aspects of our content, delivery, goals, curriculum and methods need to be adjusted to today’s needs.

OPPORTUNITY

Some things never change in our profession of developing opportunity for students. Proprietary Schools across the country have always had leadership that was looking for the best programs that would enhance opportunity and potential for students to succeed in the American workforce. Providing the best programs that do that very thing are constantly moving targets. When looking at many generations of program development we can see some of the best programs are no longer viable and our delivery systems of teaching methods have changed. During my years as an Executive Director for a for profit school I was always looking for the programs that made the best sense to offer our community. Leadership who understood the expertise to provide programs which made the best sense to economy, career services and employment opportunities found their schools thriving with students searching for this outcome in their lives.

Many of us in the post-secondary education territory have continued to adjust the strategic plan in our schools. Any great leader understands the variables that have affects on a school. Research is constantly required to understand the up and coming demands and needs of our schools. If you can read the behaviors of the economy, industry demands, technology, and population genders shifts will demand from you the decisions to make the appropriate flexibility to provide the right programs.

The pendulum is once again swinging. In the 1980’s and 90’s we saw the two year institutions growing with a need for short term programs with certifications and associate degrees. These times accounted for the growth in business colleges and technology schools. As the 21st century approached schools began to be aware of the need for higher level degrees for employment with higher salaries and job openings. Schools were being encouraged to offer higher degrees and allow students to continue in their two year institutions to finish the next level degrees by providing a 2+2 programs.

In 2019, we are experiencing a new era of demands on our schools. Our society is experiencing a huge gap and lack of skilled workers in the trades in America. Schools who had prepared for the 21st century are finding themselves in need of reassessing the programs they need to provide opportunities for their up coming students. Many two year programs today offer better salary opportunities and job placement. The education business is no different than any others offering services to society. It is important to understand the societal changes which affect school operations.

The pendulum appears now to be swinging back to fill the needs of employers. This means some schools will need to re-engineer their school programs with both type of programs and program length. It has been my fortune to observe and be part of these school changes to meet the needs of the student enrollments over the years of change. What the school industry is facing is the latest report in 2018 with the U.S. Department of Education and National Education Center of Statistics presented a problem facing post-secondary schools. Problems reported were:

Prohibitive cost increase in education. (accounted for 22,432-dollar increase)

7 million unfilled positions in America

More than half of these positions are not be trained for in our colleges.

The solution is for our schools to need to have a better understanding of :

Opportunity Offered in Your School

Some things never change in our profession of developing opportunity for students. Schools across the country have always had leadership that was looking for the best programs that would enhance opportunity and potential for students to succeed in the American workforce. Providing the best programs that do that very thing are constantly moving targets. When looking at many generations of program development we can see some of the best programs are no longer viable and our delivery systems of teaching methods have changed. During my years as an Executive Director for a for profit school I was always looking for the programs that made the best sense to offer our community. Leadership who understood the expertise to provide programs which made the best sense to economy, career services and employment opportunities found their schools thriving with students searching for this outcome in their lives. 

Many of us in the post-secondary education territory have continued to adjust the strategic plan in our schools. Any great leader understands the variables that have affects on a school. Research is constantly required to understand the up and coming demands and needs of our schools. If you can read the behaviors of the economy, industry demands, technology, and population genders shifts will demand from you the decisions to make the appropriate flexibility to provide the right programs. 

The pendulum is once again swinging. In the 1980’s and 90’s we saw the two year institutions growing with a need for short term programs with certifications and associate degrees. These times accounted for the growth in business colleges and technology schools. As the 21st century approached schools began to be aware of the need for higher level degrees for employment with higher salaries and job openings. Schools were being encouraged to offer higher degrees and allow students to continue in their two year institutions to finish the next level degrees by providing a 2+2 programs. 

In 2019, we are experiencing a new era of demands on our schools. Our society is experiencing a huge gap and lack of skilled workers in the trades in America. Schools who had prepared for the 21st century are finding themselves in need of reassessing the programs they need to provide opportunities for their up coming students. Many two year programs today offer better salary opportunities and job placement. The education business is no different than any others offering services to society. It is important to understand the societal changes which affect school operations. 

The pendulum appears now to be swinging back to fill the needs of employers. This means some schools will need to re-engineer their school programs with both type of programs and program length. It has been my fortune to observe and be part of these school changes to meet the needs of the student enrollments over the years of change. What the school industry is facing is the latest report in 2018 with the U.S. Department of Education and National Education Center of Statistics presented a problem facing post-secondary schools. Problems reported were:

Prohibitive cost increase in education. (accounted for 22,432-dollar increase)

7 million unfilled positions in America

More than half of these positions are not be trained for in our colleges.

The solution is for our schools to have a better understanding of :

Affordable skills-training programs that equip workers to:•Join the workforce in higher paying jobs 

•Have certifications that show competence. No guessing for employers 

•Improve their skills so they can take higher-paying jobs •

Partnerships

•Educational institutions and businesses must work together to create guided pathways to quality jobs for those seeking a non-traditional education

•Offers employers the opportunity to upgrade their workforce 

Over the past year I have teamed up with Quantum Educational Services to begin a turn key project to address these problems. It was evident focus had to be on the distinct markets that were in need of the absent skills and employees to fill these positions. Three distinct markets were identified for the development of the project identified as Next Step. Next Step will address distinct needs in the markets of under employed college credits, high school graduates not interested in pursuing a traditional college education and employers in need of skilled employees. 

The strategy had to assure quality by working with proven. known. and respected career focused training providers that lead to certifications. Programs need to match content and curriculum with the workplace skills. Program timelines need to be shortened for employment opportunities. Next Step will work with institutions to bring new programs to the market faster.

Understanding the need for change in program offerings for startup programs have been developed by Next Step to address supply and demand by: 

  • allowing schools to have no up-front costs for implementation. 
  • Assist schools with the new programsto develop linkage with employers looking to fill skills gaps. 
  • Letting schools offer programs that would help with the compliance of the 90/10 rule
  • Schools would have the assurances to have a team supporting the school with extensive experience
  • All programs provide outcomes with employer recognized certifications. 
  • Standardized Content
  • Potential to reduce instructional cost
  • Programs will not be sold to competing schoolslocated within a 25-mile radius.

Program Offerings Currently Available 

  • IoT (Internet of Things) for the house
  • Cybersecurity
  • Information Technology Support
  • Network Administration
  • IT Project Management
  • Electric Systems Project Management
  • Nutrition and Wellness

Coming Soon

  • Robotics
  • Manufacturing Automation
  • Medical Information
  • Health Informatics
  • Health Information Technology
  • Exercise and Nutrition for Seniors
  • EMT

Program Delivery 

  • Courses and labs are available online but can also be integrated into a face to face format 
  • The recommended delivery method for previous college graduates is either online or in a bended environment
  • The recommended delivery for high school graduates is either residential or in a blended environment. 
  • Online asynchronous and self-paced with the facilitator/instructorRegardless of modality, students will be enrolled into their courses by QES once payment for the course has been received from the participating school.

Student Benefits

  • Curriculum designed to address the specific requirements of industry certification exams.
  • Programs that are focused, affordable, and short in durationAccess to vendor employment and career development resources
  • Ability to-do 1+1+2 Diplomas, to Associate Degree leading to Bachelor . Short entry point makes commitment easier but allows student to upgrade skills with a full transition to the next advanced skill levels.

Next Step Jobs and Salaries Potential

Sources: http:// glassdoor.com and http://payscale.com

Industry Partners with Next Step

ESPA 
CompTIA
Precision Nutrition 
BEDROCK Learning


Possible Certifications Examples

  • IoT (Internet of Things) for the Home
  • Comp TIA IT Fundamentals
  • CompTIA A+
  • ESPA C-EST Certification
  • Cybersecurity
  • Comp TIA IT Fundamentals 
  • CompTIA A+
  • CompTIA Network
  • Security
  • CYSA+

Next Step Guides Schools with Turn Key Services

Product knowledge training is available for schools for admissions marketing teams and academic teams via webinars. Separate webinars would be offered for the career service team. Ongoing webinars will be available to schools for new employees for product knowledge.

Additional Services 

  • Curriculum Development
  • Distance Learning specialist
  • Faculty Professional Development
  • Performance Management
  • Financial Aid Specialist
  • Career Services Mentorship
  • Compliance / Regulatory Advisory
  • Student Retention

Next Step is a compilation of years of experience and research of the current best practices for today’s student candidates. The career school movement is in the role of producing opportunity for student graduates with a documented outcome skill verified by certification or skill measurement. We started with the issues facing career schools and our devotion is to serve career schools and their students. 

To learn more about how this can work for your career school or community college contact Next Step at: https://quantumeducationalservices.com

Dr. Gary R. Carlson

American Job Market 2019

The story of career schools has been a scapegoat for many journalist and media reporters. President Theodore Roosevelt often referred to these people as “Muckraker”.

“Muckraker” is now a common term for journalist in digging up scandal, and is usually pejorative in use. It is very necessary the we should not flinch from seeing what is vile and debasing. There is filth on the floor, and it must be scraped up with the muck-rake; and there are times and places where this service is in the most needed of all the services that can be performed.

President Theodore Roosevelt (President from 1901 to 1909)

The following of yellow journalism and scapegoating may have a very longterm negative effect on the American society. Our job market has never been better suited for jobs and employee opportunities. Below you will see a completed research by Gallup that explains this insight with the positive outlook for the job market.

The rest of the story is who is preparing our population to take advantage of this market? With each day, month and year we are seeing falling numbers of skilled workers. (Electricians, Plumbers, Welders, HVAC, Auto Technicians, construction management, information technology technicians) Will there be jobs available without people to fill the positions?

Career Schools that have been in existence for over 100 years are under attack by politicians who have no regard for the skilled education market needs. They are focusing on a student loan debacle they created and now are pointing fingers at the schools. Let’s wake up America don’t be convinced by “Muck-Rakers”. Scrape up the floor and be sure to know the facts by listening to the professionals who you trust.

Gallup Study for Job Market Opportunity in America 2019. http://bit.ly/2HunJWc

Why Elizabeth Warren’s college debt plan sucks! Frederick M. Hess

senator.elizabeth.warren-1000x986

My friend Rick Hess has recently written a good explanation of the loan forgiveness plan proposed by Senator Elizabeth Warren. Rick is a well-known author and authority in the progressive leadership for all levels of education. I had the fortune to work with him on an AEI committee and found great respect for his knowledge and wisdom.

I have included his article and have summarized some of this highlighted points.

  • Public as in the past need to take responsibility for loans. (median student loan debt is 17,000 dollars)
  • Paying off debt with government tax money is an insult to the intelligence of the tax payer.
  • Middle class workers who work hard to pay bills will be excluded from Senator Warren’s plan.
  • Those who benefit will be unemployed age in twenty-something with poetry grads from pricey schools win big.
  • precedence on bail outs has become a false answer to improvement plans
  • Senator Warren’s plan rewards big borrowers
  • Sets up punishment for those who have scrimped and teaches that playing by the rules is for suckers.

 

Why Elizabeth Warren’s college debt plan sucks Frederick M. Hess

Predicament of our Job Gap

apply-jobs-engfind-job

If you are reading this and have a job or may be unemployed this article may add some light into the future. Depending on your age you may or may not have seen the pendulum swing back and forth with jobs available, jobs not available, low unemployment rates and high unemployment rates. The 21st century has brought a  new phenomenon for the workforce of America. The categories in the past now needs to add a new class. Opportunities with new employment will be for job skills that have not  been required in the past. This spells out clearly that we may be approaching job opportunities in high abundance. The conundrum is where will you be qualified. If you are in high school or college your decisions about your employment possibilities lies at the forefront of what knowledge and skills will be in demand.

It is apparent how important schools and colleges become as our future is determined by the choices we make. A Georgetown University study acknowledges the importance of education and post secondary education. What seems to be obvious is your choices should consider level of education and skills necessary to achieve your goals of living out a life of fulfillment. We are created to enjoy our work role in life. Knowing this we need to understand how important it is to consider our future and the journey we will take in our lives. Schools and post secondary education leaders and teachers have a commitment to open the door to possibilities. This path needs to prompt an understanding which makes a difference in our life when I get up every day and go to work. Today, in 2019 our rewards of what we do necessitates learning to the level it makes us happy with a skill and being competitive in a workforce in need. A high school education alone simply provides our population that usually exists on an hourly work job. It is usually a job that may have a skill that is fleeting and what once was competitive or necessary could be replaced with technology or becomes unnecessary.  The more advanced learning obtained gives all of our job seekers on a track for being competitive and skilled.

Clearly, attending post secondary education provides this population a higher lifetime income. Associate Degree attainment in demand skill areas earn lifetime income equal to a Bachelor Degree lifetime income on average 28% of the time. A Bachelor Degree graduate has the potential on average earning in a lifetime of 2.3 million dollars.

Realizing all of this documented information what could be the spasmodic outcomes that are going to happen that may cause America to have employers required to look outside of the borders to fill their gaps of employment? This this circumstance is present today. Our perceptible vision of what will transpire may be clouded by rhetoric which singles out solutions where harm may actually come with bias, prejudice or individual benefit. Foreseen predicaments that will be issues in the near future.

  • Lack of employer and school articulations with meaningful outcomes of career discovery and feasibility for future occupations
  • Reduction of opportunities for citizens to locate and learn appropriate skills to be competitive
  • Accepting political solutions for an educational blueprint which focuses on financial liquidity
  • Lack of understanding the freedom of choice for communities to provide locally or statewide education equal to the needs
  • Lack of support for diverse opportunities by special niches of schools
  • Teacher retention and performance improvement
  • Flexibility on delivery methods of obtaining an education
  • Creativity reduced with obstructions by a cold oppressive regulatory environment
  • Reactionary leaders
  • accessibility
  • affordability
  • Quick fixes
  • Governed schools strictly by regulations

Knowing these predicaments our society needs to become involved in the decision-making for their schools in America. This is one area of outcomes that can be affected by the citizens of the country. U.S. citizens have always been committed to education because of its potential outcomes. There has been a slow gradual slippage of ability to make a difference from the majority world census in the education footprint in our community.

Schools and Colleges in the past few years have been under stress from the financial influences governing public schools and schools who have accepted federal government assistance. The recognized schools today in America who have been or could be affected by the financial strings attached to their schools:

Types of Postsecondary Schools
  • Colleges.
  • Universities.
  • Community colleges.
  • Junior college.
  • Career school, technical school, or vocational / trade school.
  • Public vs. Private.
  • Special Interests.

Schools are an outgrowth of community needs and freedom of choice by their citizens. This existence has been present for many years but in the 21st century the control and decisions of existence has been lost at the local and state levels. Individuals have run and championed the understanding of censoring what used to be community freedom of choice schools to outliers who scapegoat some providers. Any type of school being targeted for demise which offers needed skill and knowledge development should not be removed from the community’s populations opportunity.

 

Since 2016, one hundred career schools plus have been closed. In the Forbes magazine December 13, 2018, there is a frightening article entitled “Will Half Of All Colleges Really Close In The Next Decade?” It reported that 25% of private colleges were now running at a deficit. Even public colleges expenses have outpaced revenue for the past three years.

As a citizen of this country this predicament will likely affect each of us. The answers t these issues you may have heard will not be the quick fix to the issues. Re-engineering schools will come from innovation and ground roots of community and state. The basis of free college is absurd. You and my fellow citizens will pay a high price to make that happen. This will only attach more restraints to a system that already holds burdens of financial strings over our schools. Many thousands of students and individual schools from the list above have been closed in the last three years which were motivated by federal government actions.

It is time to separate from a predicament to state and community local control.